Alerts and Updates

IRS Warns of Ongoing Tax Scams

March 22, 2019

The IRS kicked off its annual Dirty Dozen list of the most prevalent, and dangerous, tax scams by warning taxpayers to remain vigilant of these ongoing schemes during tax season and throughout the year. Highlighted below, in reverse chronological order, is the 2019 list.

6. Tax Return Preparer Fraud

The IRS advises taxpayers to choose tax return preparers carefully.

For more information, see the IRS news release.

5. Falsifying Income and Bogus Documents

The IRS directs taxpayers to avoid schemes involving falsifying income, including the creation of bogus Forms 1099.

For more information, see the IRS news release.

4. Inflated Tax Refunds

The IRS cautions taxpayers to be alert to unscrupulous tax return preparers boasting of inflated tax refunds, a common scam tactic during filing season.

For more information, see the IRS news release.

3. Identity Theft

The IRS notifies taxpayers that this scam remains extremely serious. The scam occurs when a stolen Social Security number or Individual Taxpayer Identification Number is used to file a fraudulent tax return to claim a misdirected refund.

For more information, see the IRS news release.

2. Phone Scams

The IRS warns taxpayers to be alert to, and vigilant against, tax time phone scams or “vishing” (voice phishing), which are continuing with increasing frequency, where aggressive criminals pose as IRS agents in hopes of stealing money or personal information.

For more information, see the IRS news release.

1. Phishing 

The IRS kicked off its annual Dirty Dozen list of tax scams by warning  taxpayers, including individuals, businesses, and tax professionals, to be alert for a continuing surge of fake emails, text messages, websites and social media attempts to steal personal information.

For more information, see the IRS news release.

TAG's Perspective

As we have been cautioning our clients and friends for years now, never respond to an unsolicited email, unsolicited text or unsolicited phone call. That is, if you did not initiate the discussion, whether an email or text or phone call, etc., don't proceed. Just delete. No voluntary responses. This simple approach avoids ugly consequences. TAG will post updates as the IRS announces additions to the list over the next couple of weeks.

For Further Information

If you would like more information about this topic or your own unique situation, please contact Michael A. Gillen or Steven M. Packer. For information about other pertinent tax topics, please visit our publications page.

Disclaimer: This Alert has been prepared and published for informational purposes only and is not offered, nor should be construed, as legal advice. For more information, please see the firm's full disclaimer.